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Differential Equations (Notes) / Second Order DE`s / Real & Distinct Roots   [Notes]
Differential Equations - Notes

Internet Explorer 10 & 11 Users : If you have been using Internet Explorer 10 or 11 to view the site (or did at one point anyway) then you know that the equations were not properly placed on the pages unless you put IE into "Compatibility Mode". I believe that I have partially figured out a way around that and have implimented the "fix" in the Algebra notes (not the practice/assignment problems yet). It's not perfect as some equations that are "inline" (i.e. equations that are in sentences as opposed to those on lines by themselves) are now shifted upwards or downwards slightly but it is better than it was.

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 Real, Distinct Roots

It’s time to start solving constant coefficient, homogeneous, linear, second order differential equations.  So, let’s recap how we do this from the last section.  We start with the differential equation.

 

 

 

Write down the characteristic equation.

 

 

 

Solve the characteristic equation for the two roots, r1 and r2.  This gives the two solutions

 

 

 

Now, if the two roots are real and distinct (i.e.   ) it will turn out that these two solutions are “nice enough” to form the general solution

 

 

 

As with the last section, we’ll ask that you believe us when we say that these are “nice enough”.  You will be able to prove this easily enough once we reach a later section.

 

With real, distinct roots there really isn’t a whole lot to do other than work a couple of examples so let’s do that.

 

Example 1  Solve the following IVP.

                                  

Solution

The characteristic equation is

                                                            

 

Its roots are r1 = - 8 and r2 = -3 and so the general solution and its derivative is.

                                                      

 

Now, plug in the initial conditions to get the following system of equations.

                                                       

 

Solving this system gives  and .  The actual solution to the differential equation is then

                                                         

 

Example 2  Solve the following IVP

                                  

Solution

The characteristic equation is

                                                            

 

Its roots are r1 = - 5 and r2 = 2 and so the general solution and its derivative is.

                                                       

 

Now, plug in the initial conditions to get the following system of equations.

                                                       

 

Solving this system gives  and .  The actual solution to the differential equation is then

                                                        

 

Example 3  Solve the following IVP.

                                 

Solution

The characteristic equation is

                                                           

 

Its roots are r1 =  and r2 = -2 and so the general solution and its derivative is.

                                                       

 

Now, plug in the initial conditions to get the following system of equations.

                                                      

 

Solving this system gives c1 = -9 and c2 = 3.  The actual solution to the differential equation is then.

                                                          

 

Example 4  Solve the following IVP

                                        

Solution

The characteristic equation is

                                                               

 

The roots of this equation are r1 = 0 and r2 = .  Here is the general solution as well as its derivative.

                                                  

 

Up to this point all of the initial conditions have been at  and this one isn’t.  Don’t get too locked into initial conditions always being at  and you just automatically use that instead of the actual value for a given problem.

 

So, plugging in the initial conditions gives the following system of equations to solve.

                                                        

 

Solving this gives.

                                                     

 

The solution to the differential equation is then.

                                          

 

In a differential equations class most instructors (including me….) tend to use initial conditions at t = 0 because it makes the work a little easier for the students as they are trying to learn the subject.  However, there is no reason to always expect that this will be the case, so do not start to always expect initial conditions at t = 0!

 

Let’s do one final example to make another point that you need to be made aware of.

 

Example 5  Find the general solution to the following differential equation.

                                                            

Solution

The characteristic equation is.

                                                              

 

The roots of this equation are.

                                                               

 

Now, do NOT get excited about these roots they are just two real numbers.

                                  

 

Admittedly they are not as nice looking as we may be used to, but they are just real numbers.  Therefore, the general solution is

                                                    

 

If we had initial conditions we could proceed as we did in the previous two examples although the work would be somewhat messy and so we aren’t going to do that for this example.

 

The point of the last example is make sure that you don’t get to used to “nice”, simple roots.  In practice roots of the characteristic equation will generally not be nice, simple integers or fractions so don’t get too used to them!

Basic Concepts Previous Section   Next Section Complex Roots
First Order DE's Previous Chapter   Next Chapter Laplace Transforms

Differential Equations (Notes) / Second Order DE`s / Real & Distinct Roots    [Notes]

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